About Abbeville

Abbeville

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Together with its surrounding villages Abbeville is much the same size as Burgess Hill, but it has a rather more agricultural feel due to the local sugar beet industry.
 
 

Abbeville is located in the Picardie region of northern France and is the capital of Picardie Maritime.

Specialities of the area include Chantilly cream, salt marsh lamb, seafood and tarte au Maroilles (cheese with orange-red rind and strong smell). Following the huge success in 2008 of the French comedy film Bienvenue chez les Ch'tis, interest in the cheese grew to the point where supermarkets ran out of stock.

On the banks of the Somme

abbeville_streetAbbeville sits on the banks of the fast flowing river Somme which caused disastrous flooding in March / April 2001.

About 12 miles away at the mouth of the Somme lies the pretty town of Saint-Valery-sur-Somme, famous as the setting off point for William the Conqueror’s invasion of England. These days it is a pleasant place to stroll around, admire the views across the estuary and visit the Bird Reserve at Marquenterre.

Modern town

Abbeville was heavily bombed in the last war and is now a largely modern town. Paris is 142 km away and the direct rail link takes 1 hour 45 minutes.

Exploring Abbeville

Saint-SepulcreThere are interesting places to visit on foot.

You will discover the stunning modern stained glass of the Church of Saint-Sepulcre, Abbeville’s own mini chateau – the Chateau de Bagatelle and the Collegiate Church of Saint-Vulfran which dates back to 1488.

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Saint-Vulfran

"What a joyous, pure pleasure it is to arrive at Abbeville on a beautiful summer's afternoon, and see Saint-Vulfran before the sun has disappeared behind the towers . . . this is one of the reasons why we must always cherish our past."
John Ruskin (1819-1900)

"Comme plaisir joyeux et sans mélange, arriver à Abbeville par un bel après-midi d'été pour voir Saint-Vulfran avant que le soleil ait quitté les tours, sont des choses pour lesquelles il faut chérir le passé jusqu'à la fin."
John Ruskin (1819-1900)